High School Lesson Plans: Economic Development

High School Lesson Plans: Economic Development

These resources are appropriate for grade levels 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th.
Lesson Plans:


  1. Economic Sectors and International Development

    Using poverty rate as a measure of development, students select countries five at a time to compare how resources are allocated to three economic sectors (agriculture, industrial, service). After making comparisons, students will identify patterns in which sector is emphasized by the wealthiest countries, and will look for patterns in the geographic distribution of countries.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 2-3 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit EconEdLink.



  2. The Economics of Income: The Rich Nations Mystery
    Why are some countries very wealthy and others so poor? In this lesson you will learn about the factors that contribute to a nation's standard of living.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 2-3 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit EconEdLink.



  3. Studying Locally, Teaching Globally: Role Playing to Understand Outsourcing
    In this lesson, students work in small groups to create outlines and mind-maps that demonstrate their understanding of the effects of outsourcing on economic relationships and the U.S. economy.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 1-2 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit New York Times.



  4. Culture and the Corporation: Exploring How Companies Adapt to Foreign Marketplaces
    In this lesson, students will examine how Disney learned from past experience to adapt its business plan for a new cultural environment. Students then research the culture of a foreign country and develop their own plan for introducing a new company there.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 1-2 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit New York Times.



  5. Economics: The Effect of Globalization
    Using China as a case study, students will explore the entry of developing countries into the WTO and the effects of globalization. What is the WTO? Who gains and who loses from globalization? Students will focus on two perspectives:

    1. The entry of developing countries into the WTO is hurting those countries.

    2. The entry of developing countries into the WTO is empowering those countries.

    Using the Academic Controversy model, students will develop skills in: creating and presenting arguments; researching; collaboration and communication; conflict resolution and consensus-building. Students will be evaluated on participation, use of student organizers, and a culminating project, which will demonstrate their understanding of the content and their mastery of the Academic Controversy process.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 2-3 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit Wideangle.



  6. Russia's Conversion: From Communism to Capitalism
    Using Russia as a case study, help students examine the real-world struggles of converting from a command economy to a market economy. Begin by defining the terms "command economy" and "market economy". Invite students to name countries that have or have had each type of economy. Build on student responses to develop a list of characteristics that describe each economic system.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 1-2 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit Frontline.



  7. Development
    In this lesson students will learn the fundamental concepts of economic development. Students will learn about the role of globalization in developing societies, different theories of why some countries are more developed than others. They will be able to identify the key institutions and players in the field of international development. Students will research, write, present and evaluate grant proposals to fund a development project that encompasses a specific strategy of development (Poverty Reduction, Trade-Not-Aid, Good Governance or Sustainable Development).

    Time needed for lesson plan: 2-3 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit Globalization101.



  8. Unit on International Monetary Fund and World Bank

    In this lesson students will learn about international organizations, specifically the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, two of the most influential and important global economic institutions. In addition to learning about the history, basic structure and policies of these institutions and the role of the United States, students will be introduced to some of the challenges faced by these institutions. Students will prepare for class by reading the IMF and World Bank Issue Brief and a Washington Post article introducing the World Bank. Class time will be divided into two parts. First, the teacher will guide students through an introductory background and discussion on international institutions using the World Bank as an example. Second, students will be introduced to several key issues facing the World Bank as it makes lending decisions through a brief role-play.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 1-2 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit Globalization101.



  9. Globalization and Foreign Investment
    This unit contains a series of activities in which students will learn about the role of foreign investment in an economy, learn about the differences between foreign direct investment and foreign portfolio investment, and participate in a role-playing activity on government decision-making related to foreign investment policies.

    Time needed for lesson plan: 2-3 hours

    To link to the actual lesson plan, please visit Globalization101.



Units:


  1. Liberating the Entrepreneurial Spirit For Good
    The first lesson in this series of four lessons is Progress & Possibility. The intention of this lesson is to open your mind to the positive progress humanity has made over millennia and, specifically, during the past few centuries, and to the very real possibilities
    and opportunities for continuing progress towards broadly distributed peace, prosperity,and well-being. Since the predominant messages projected through the mass media are dark, negative, and pessimistic, we understand that it is imperative to shift the context from, what our colleague Marilyn King calls "stinkin' thinkin'" to a more balanced and accurate understanding of how well we are doing as a species and a society. Indeed, there is significant evidence that optimism itself is a factor in success. "Learned Optimism" refers to the idea that you can learn to be more optimistic and thereby become more successful. And in the Working for Good context, "more successful" means becoming more successful at making the world a better place, as well as more professionally successful on an individual basis.

    The second lesson, The Entrepreneurial Spirit, focuses on the profound contribution to humanity made by the individual human spirit expressing its unique vision of possibilities and pursuing that vision with focus, determination, and skill. And we explore the conditions that support individual initiative towards the enhancement of life for all.

    Lesson three, Entrepreneurs in Service, focuses on the role of entrepreneurship in service to society.

    Lesson four, Liberating the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Good, focuses on the qualities and skills required to activate and sustain the entrepreneurial spirit within yourself, to effectively manifest your own powerful vision of service to society. We welcome you to this journey, and we look forward to communicating and collaborating with you to support each other in our endeavors to liberate the entrepreneurial spirit for good.


    Time needed for lesson plan: Varies

    To link to the actual unit plan, please visit Working For Good, a Curriculum of  F.L.O.W., Inc..



  2. The Developed Countries and the Promise of Globalization
    This is a three unit curriculum that concentrates on global inequity, the potential influence of globalization development, and lastly how the promise of globalization might be fulfilled. More specifically, Unit 2 focuses on the developed, or advanced countries as participants in the global economy. It provides students with insights into the globalization process, both historically and in the present. The unit also features a number of factors that contribute to globalization and the prosperity that this process can generate—especially for the developed world. The developed countries benefit directly from their advanced technologies, immense wealth (and thus the capacity to benefit from international trade, foreign direct investment, and financial dealing in global capital markets), and economic and political freedoms. The unit concludes with one downside of globalization, however—the danger of financial contagion in a global economy that is so highly integrated and interdependent. Materials in the Resource Guide include six Student Readings, eight Student Activities, and thirteen transparencies. Key social studies skills include analyzing and expressing viewpoints, organizing information (tables and flow chart), conducting original research (for case studies and a competitiveness report), reading for information (CAPT model).

    Time needed for lesson plan: Varies

    To link to the actual unit plan, please visit Center for International Business Research and Education.







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