Global Economy Won't Score at This Year's World Cup

Global Economy Won't Score at This Year's World Cup

For soccer fans, going to the World Cup is a dream come true. Watching the games on TV or online is the next best thing. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/snapeverything/4692406069/">Axel Bührmann (flickr)</a>
For soccer fans, going to the World Cup is a dream come true. Watching the games on TV or online is the next best thing. Photo: Axel Bührmann (flickr)

It's probably no surprise that for big-time soccer fans, watching the world cup is more enjoyable than working. But breaks taken to check the latest score and watch part or all of the game collectively add up to big dips in productivity, according to a recent Atlantic Monthly article on the economics of the World Cup.

As the tournament gets closer to the finals there are even bigger slides in productivity. The Center for Economics and Business Research estimates that the price tag for a month of sports-induced distraction amounts to $2.8 billion.

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