The Next Green Revolution

The Next Green Revolution

Photo: Reuters/Finbarr O'Reilly
Photo: Reuters/Finbarr O'Reilly

A controversial article in a recent Economist refers to further evidence of the advantages of genetically modified crops (GMOs).

"The Next Green Revolution" discusses long-standing opposition to GMOs in Europe โ€” many on the continent "have yet to touch or taste them," the article reads โ€” but points out that rising GMO production means it will become increasingly more expensive for Europe to avoid importing them.

I have long been concerned about the Europeans' stance on GMOs โ€” not because Europeans are denying themselves more cost-effective food products, but because of the impact that their position has had on the poor, particularly in Africa. A number of African countries have followed Europe's lead by banning imports of GMOs. I find it to be very sad when the poor and sometimes starving are denied access to less-expensive food because of short-sighted logic in Europe.

The fact that GMOs can provide cheaper food has long been generally accepted. But critics have argued against GMOs on the basis that the crops might have long-term risks. But these risks are vague and unspecified, so to deny the advantages never seemed logical to me. Now that the possible disadvantage to GMOs has been put to rest in many parts of the world, I hope the poor and hungry in Africa and elsewhere can finally access this money-saving solution to an important problem.

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